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Frankenstein’s Rash

healing Hope humility insights Joan Winifred leadership sovereignty Transformations True v. False Religion Truth

itch, itch, scratch, scratch, bleed, bleed…

hmmmmm, HOPE(ing) NOT…but this has the ‘alive’ (monster??)movement signs…(hand(s) wiggling, dentrite(s) tingling)

of a BAD rash?!
needing some heavy-duty potent cream.

the kind of “mind” rash that won’t easily go away…

makings of mind viruses/mind rashes…communicable diseases…picked up by arrogant mobs or poorly sanitized public schools/institutions or other private/public? political places where (sick? healthy?) minds may gather/openly idle.

(The UN?;))

You know how when you send your off kid to prison/school…they come back with attitude(s), bad language, immature/deadly/gossipy ideas and literal lice, chicken pox, pink eye??…

Yeah, man/woman we all think we are playing “God”…but which God??
our individual-self-directed-will on the reality landscape…free will reign…three choices present:
1. my will
2. the will of the people (very broad spectrum of sick and of health: mental, emotional, physical, spiritual, psychological)
3. God’s Will
a. True/Good God? b. Fake/Bad God?

and the doing of: the choice:
1. my will…with what result(s)??
2. mob will…(collective will of the people both sick/healthy)..result?
3. God’s will…consequence?

the positives/the negatives
foreseeable/unforeseeable
intentional/unintentional

Cause looking around/aka deeply analy-zing…yep, it’s a zinger!! at a lot of human…(selfish?) solutions…piecework…(aka peace? work, yeah, right)…various forms of government/organization/big religion/big business/policy…the product…(the benefits/the cons)…and overtime…short, medium, long…term:

Ultimately: evidence of history: modern and ancient (individual/collective)…IF we are not very cautious/careful and selfless…when we let our own free will reign supreme and the will of the people via (i.e. forms of government/leadership including democracy, etc.)…and the will of a fake god…bottom line: you end up with a monster & Frankenstein’s rash…corrupting and eating away…rotting, festering flesh…gangrene!

That’s partially why…years ago…(at 12/16)…i made dedication then a vow…of disowning my own will…and to work very hard each day at the doing of God’s will…the TRUE GOD…of love: Yahweh.

the greatest quest…in my life…searching for Truth and Yahweh.

Yahweh didn’t create dark, gruesome, (metaphorical & literal) UGLY/SCARY monsters…and mayhem.

He created light, BEAUTY!…and everlasting sustainability of real life.

(post to be? continued? may be.)

the curing cream: intense bible study/application

INTENSE LOVE

(agape in action)

11/16/18 @ 12:14 p.m.

a p.s. “Abijah”

Whatever its exact nature, Abijah’s goodness was noteworthy. First, it was genuine. This goodness was “in him”​—that is, in his heart. Second, it was exceptional. Abijah exhibited this goodness even though he was “in the house of Jeroboam.” One scholar says: “It is a great commendation for men to retain their goodness whilest they live in bad places and families.” Another says that Abijah’s goodness was “conspicuous . . . , just as the stars are brightest when the sky is dark, and the cedars are most beautiful when surrounding trees are leafless.”

Most important, the words of 1 Kings 14:13 teach us something beautiful about Jehovah and what he looks for in us. Recall that something good was “found in” Abijah. Jehovah evidently searched through Abijah’s heart until He found a trace of goodness. Compared to his family, Abijah was, as one scholar put it, the lone pearl “in a heap of pebbles.” Jehovah cherished this goodness and rewarded it, granting a measure of mercy to this one member of a wicked family.

“ALL hearts Jehovah is searching, and every inclination of the thoughts he is discerning.” (1 Chronicles 28:9) Those inspired words were meant to fill us with appreciation for the depth of Jehovah’s interest in us. Jehovah looks for the good in our hearts even though we are far from perfect. [He Looks for the Good–Draw close to God, w July, 2010]

 

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Happy Day-o to Young & Old?? OH!

appreciation attitude beach healing Joan Winifred laughter leadership respect

This commercial/marketing tool (aka smart advertising piece of propaganda?;))…tickles my corny-funny bone…lol:)

It always brings me a chuckle & :)…please! be assured, I Respect & LOVE Older-More-Experienced & Wiser-than-me Breathing-Fragile-Life.

(Brings back fond memories of my Grandmother.)

{BTW: am not endorsing e-trade, disrespecting the elderly…or investing in the Lieing to the Masses “Titanic”…aka the old-dieing, fast-changing commercial/political/economical landscape(s)…and current (on it’s way out/popular fluctuating flavor(s) of the moment/week/month/year) failing framework of human societyoops, getting too serious now, eh?!}

okay, okay!…(but putting my confidence/hope/faith in the above-alluded to shifting-sandy-shady places..is a (sad) joke in my POV)…

Am endorsing LAUGHTER!:)

(this was suppose to be a light/fun post)

It/commercial just strikes me as really funny!…probably because of living in FL…where many working/highly contributing Seniors abound and where “old” and its definition is “relative”…usually “old” is considered in your nineties somewhere.

Though my teens think i’m ‘old’ at 49.5. i consider 25 and younger…’kid’.

i aspire to this woman…”DJ Nana” lol:)…with my sick beats selections on my posts, eh?;)…cracking myself up as i type…

(the simple pleasures in life)…and hard work and…

to continue breathing, learning, and working is a blessing.

Age(ing) with skill is gift. 🙂

Hoping this brings You a little laugh.

@11:17 a.m. 11/15/18

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on my side

Breathing-Fragile-Life choice contentment courage forgiveness God healing hope Hope humility insights Joan Winifred justice lamentations of the heart leadership never giving up! patience positive qualities power prisoners questions reality sovereignty spiritual food study Transformations trust Truth

IF there is an “ALMIGHTY” God/Ultimate Designer/Architect of the Universe/Creator of Man & Earth/Yahweh/Supreme Sovereign/Maker of TREES…True God of LOVE…”s–l–o–w to anger and  a       b     u     n      d      a      n    t      in loving-kindness”…merciful and Freely Forgiving…:) who cannot lie!!…

do i want “Him” on MY side??!

there are frequent/rare times in life…when over/underwhelmed, betrayed, rejected, bored…lonely, lost, depressed, sick, sad, grieving…tortuous to the soul/tough times; all of us have faced these in varying lengths and in varying degrees/forms…for me, just “thinking” , approaching life/challenges/disasters/disappointments/death differently/(outside typical boxes) from Others: for example, obviously—IF You read my blog—i tend to be more spiritually minded v. secularly/academically/mathematically/materially minded..etc..my meditation/analization processes tilt toward..(spirituality)…Spiritual/Biblical Truth…my obsession.

it’s the stable/anchor place of deeply satisfying-comforting answers that completely/repetely nourish my mind/heart/kidneys and which make the most sense to imperfect-limited me.

a Biblical character i admire a lot…”Joseph”…an excerpted article: check it out IF YOU:) so choose: “Please Listen to This Dream w August 2014:

How did Joseph get into such a terrible predicament? And what can we learn from the faith of a young man who was victimized and rejected by members of his own family?

Joseph came from a very large family​—but not a happy and united one. The Bible’s portrait of Jacob’s family stands as vivid proof of the negative effects of polygamy​—an entrenched practice that God tolerated among his people until his Son restored the original standard of monogamy. (Matthew 19:4-6) Jacob had at least 14 children by four different women​—his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and their maidservants, Zilpah and Bilhah. From the start, Jacob was in love with his beautiful Rachel. He never felt such an attachment to Leah, Rachel’s older sister, whom he had been tricked into marrying. A bitter rivalry persisted between the two women, and that jealousy carried  over to the children of the household.​—Genesis 29:16-35; 30:1, 8, 19, 20; 37:35.

Rachel was barren for a long time, and when she finally gave birth to Joseph, Jacob treated this son of his old age as special. For example, when the family were on their way to a dangerous meeting with Jacob’s murderous brother, Esau, Jacob made sure that Rachel and little Joseph were given the safest position at the rear of the household group. That tense day must have made a deep impression on Joseph. Imagine how he felt that morning as he wondered, wide-eyed, why his aged but vigorous father was now walking with a limp. How amazed he must have been to learn the reason: His father had struggled the night before with a mighty angel! And why? Because Jacob wanted a blessing from Jehovah God. Jacob’s reward was the change of his name to Israel. A whole nation would bear his name! (Genesis 32:22-31) In time, Joseph learned that the sons of Israel were to father the tribes of that nation!

Later, young Joseph faced tragedy firsthand when the dearest person in his young life left him all too soon. His mother died while giving birth to his younger brother, Benjamin. His father grieved deeply over the loss. Imagine Jacob gently wiping the tears from Joseph’s eyes, comforting him with the same hope that had once comforted Jacob’s grandfather Abraham. How touched Joseph must have been to learn that Jehovah would one day restore his mother to life! Perhaps Joseph came to have even deeper love for the generous “God . . . of the living.” (Luke 20:38; Hebrews 11:17-19) In the wake of the loss of his wife, Jacob always had tender feelings for those two boys, his sons by Rachel.​—Genesis 35:18-20;37:3; 44:27-29.

Many children would be spoiled or corrupted by such special treatment; but Joseph learned from the many good qualities of his parents, and he developed strong faith as well as a keen sense of right and wrong. At the age of 17, he was working as a shepherd, assisting some of his older brothers, when he noticed some wrongdoing on their part. Was he tempted to keep the matter quiet so as to gain their favor? In any case, he did what was right. He reported the matter to his father. (Genesis 37:2) Perhaps that brave act confirmed Jacob’s high opinion of this beloved son. What an excellent example for […] youths to think about! When tempted to conceal the serious sin of another​—perhaps a sibling or a friend—​it is wise to imitate Joseph and make sure that the matter is known to those who are in a position to help the wrongdoer.​—Leviticus 5:1.

Perhaps because of Joseph’s courageous stand for what was right, Jacob bestowed an honor on the boy. He had a special garment made for his son. (Genesis 37:3) It has often been called a striped coat or a coat of many colors, but there is scant evidence for such renderings. Likely, it was a long, elegant robe, perhaps reaching to the extremities of the arms and legs. It was probably the kind of garb that a nobleman or a prince might wear.

“When his brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers, they began to hate him, and they could not speak peaceably to him.”  (Genesis 37:4) Their jealousy may be understandable, but Joseph’s brothers were unwise to give in to that poisonous emotion. (Proverbs 14:30; 27:4) Have you ever found yourself seething with envy when someone received attention or honor that you wanted? Remember Joseph’s brothers. Their jealousy led them to commit deeds that they would come to regret deeply. Their example serves to remind Christians that it is far wiser to “rejoice with those who rejoice.”​—Romans 12:15.

Joseph surely sensed his brothers’ animosity. So did he stash his fancy robe out of sight when his brothers were near? He might have been tempted to do so. Remember, though, that Jacob wanted the robe to be a sign of favor and love. Joseph wanted to live up to his father’s trust in him, so he loyally wore the garment. His example is useful for us. Although our own heavenly Father is never partial, he does at times single out  his loyal servants and favor them. Furthermore, he asks them to stand out as different from this corrupt and immoral world. Like Joseph’s special robe, the conduct of true Christians makes them different from those around them. Such conduct sometimes incites jealousy and animosity. (1 Peter 4:4) Should a Christian hide his true identity as a servant of God? No​—no more than Joseph should have hidden his robe.​—Luke 11:33.

a dreamer of dreams…

It was not long before Joseph had two extraordinary dreams. In the first dream, Joseph saw himself and his brothers, each binding a sheaf of grain. But then his brothers’ sheaves encircled his sheaf and bowed down to it as it stood erect. In the second dream, the sun, the moon, and 11 stars were bowing down to Joseph. (Genesis 37:6, 7, 9) What should Joseph do about those strange and vivid dreams?

The dreams came from Jehovah God. They were prophetic in nature, and God meant for Joseph to pass along the message they contained. In a sense, Joseph was to do what all the later prophets did when they related God’s messages and judgments to His wayward people.

Joseph tactfully said to his brothers: “Please listen to this dream that I had.” His brothers understood the dream, and they did not like it one bit. They answered: “Are you really going to make yourself king over us and dominate us?” The account adds: “So they found another reason to hate him, because of his dreams and what he said.” When Joseph related the second dream to his father as well as his brothers, the reaction was not much better. We read: “His father rebuked him and said to him: ‘What is the meaning of this dream of yours? Am I as well as your mother and your brothers really going to come and bow down to the earth to you?’” However, Jacob kept thinking the matter over. Might (Yahweh) Jehovah be communicating with the boy?​—Genesis 37:6, 8, 10, 11.

HATED…Ouchy-wawa! 🙁

Not long afterward, Jacob sent young Joseph on a journey. The older sons were tending the flocks up north near Shechem, where they had recently made bitter enemies. Naturally, Jacob was concerned about his sons, so he sent Joseph to check on their welfare. Can you imagine Joseph’s feelings? He knew that his brothers hated him more than ever! How would they like it when he came to them as their father’s spokesman? Nonetheless, Joseph obediently set out.​—Genesis 34:25-30; 37:12-14.

It was quite a trek​—in all, perhaps four or five days of walking. Shechem lay about 50 miles (80 km) to the north of Hebron. But at Shechem, Joseph learned that his brothers had moved on to Dothan, which lay another 14 miles (22 km) or so to the north. When Joseph finally neared Dothan, his brothers saw him coming from a distance. Immediately their hatred boiled to the surface. The account reads: “They said to one another: ‘Look! Here comes that dreamer. Come, now, let us kill him and pitch him into one of the waterpits, and we will say that a vicious wild animal devoured him. Then let us see what will become of his dreams.’” Reuben, however, persuaded his brothers to throw Joseph into a pit alive, hoping that he could rescue the boy later on.​—Genesis 37:19-22.

Unsuspecting, Joseph approached them, no doubt hoping for a peaceful meeting. Instead, his brothers attacked him! Roughly, they stripped off his special robe, dragged him to a dried-out waterpit, and pushed him in. Down Joseph fell! Recovering from the shock, he struggled to his feet, but he could never climb out on his own. He saw only a circle of sky as his brothers’ voices receded. He cried out to them, pleading, but they ignored him. Callously, they ate a meal nearby. While Reuben was absent, they again considered killing the boy, but Judah persuaded them to sell him to passing merchants instead. Dothan was near the trade route to Egypt, and it was not long before a caravan of Ishmaelites and Midianites came by. Before Reuben returned, the deed was done. For 20 shekels, they had sold their brother as a slave.​—Genesis 37:23-28; 42:21.

As Joseph was taken south along the road to Egypt, he seemed to have lost everything. He was cut off! For years, he would know nothing of his family​—nothing of Reuben’s anguish when he returned to find Joseph gone; nothing of Jacob’s grief when he was deceived into believing that his beloved Joseph was dead; nothing of his aged grandfather Isaac, who still lived; and nothing of his beloved younger brother, Benjamin, whom he would miss dearly. But was Joseph left with nothing at all?​—Genesis 37:29-35.

Joseph still had something that his brothers could never take from him: faith. He knew much about his God, Yahweh/Jehovah, and nothing could rob him of that​—not the loss of his home, not the hardships of captivity on the long journey to Egypt, and not even the humiliation of being sold as a slave to a wealthy Egyptian named Potiphar. (Genesis 37:36) Joseph’s faith and his determination to stay close to his God only grew stronger through such hardships.

It’s very commendable (and imitation worthy from my POV) Joseph never gave up hope, never became bitter; nor haughty when put in a powerful position, “Avrekh” , 2nd to Pharaoh…He didn’t retaliate, seek revenge/compensation for years of unjustly suffering…Amazing!! Joseph “continued” loving his Brothers (aka jealous enemies in His own household) exercising patience…which provided them opportunity for positive transformation. He forgave his brothers. Preserving many lives!

i like this song and video about Joseph:

questions for reflections:
what are my personal/individual hardships growing in me?!
negatives?! positives?!

am i getting bitter or better?!

am i being patient?

forgiving?

how will “accurate” faith/knowledge/Truth, forgiveness, hope, humility, gratitude,

God!…

get me through the ups and downs/the highs and lows

the reality of this fleeting/fast-paced life?

(whom does one turn to when even your own brothers/family hate/are against You?! How about God??)

p.s. life lesson:  don’t hate (nor love?) the messenger, eh?! 😉

Good Night/Good Day to You Reader:)

11/15/18 @ 12:16 a.m.

p.p.s.

I AM NOT ALONE!!! 

🙂

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Intangibility vs. Tangibility

attitude faith insights Joan Winifred leadership Truth

Some of us, Fellow-Humans, place a value (in varying degrees) and/or highly value the tangible: the taste, the touch. Some of us, Fellow-Breathing-Thinking-Life, place a value (along a spectrum) and/or highly value the intangible: the impalpable; the untouchable, the abstract.

An “authentic” life aka authentic/honest and non-hypocritical living…seems, to me, to be a constant/consistent juggle…a balancing act and, at times, a difficult tightrope walk of the intangible and the tangible…or the tangible v. the intangible v. the intangible v. the tangible…ad infinitum?!

It looks like and feels like and sounds like…”some” of our “human” problems may be (?!) attributed to devaluing the intangible over the tangible and vice versa…at inappropriate times! Significant Times, in life, may call for prioritizing the tangible over the intangible and at Other Worthy Times…the intangible over the tangible.

However, i think…an authentic/honest/real life walk in life means not abdicating/abandoning one (tangibility and intangibility) over the other…but simultaneously in tandem…keeping both lights on brightly.

Better is a handful of rest than two handfuls of hard work and chasing after the wind.” (Ecclesiastes 4:6)

{Curious;) to me how the above-mentioned wise-Biblical verse comes to mind…cause I am tired today.}

Perhaps, only a perfect human can actually walk on water. (:)) Sort of an aside: this thought brings me to the Sage of Peace also known to some as the Greatest Man Who Ever Lived: Jesus. He adroitly handled the intangible and tangible with a complete union/unity/an impactful immediacy (and longevity)…aka miracle worker. Is that what a miracle worker does??…perfectly measures, synthesizes, aligns the tangible with the intangible/the intangible with the tangible…in an instant unification…effectuating positive changes. (A superlative Leader, A positive-change agent of real-reality.)

For example, positive changes for women.  How, When, Who, What:  has “really” emancipated or enslaved women?? technology?

Jesus, back in the first century…

Consider, for example, the occasion when Jesus spoke to a woman at a well. “A woman of Samaria came to draw water,” says John’s Gospel account, and “Jesus said to her: ‘Give me a drink.’” Jesus was willing to talk with a Samaritan woman in public, even though most Jews had no dealings with Samaritans. According to The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, for Jews “conversation with a woman in a public place was particularly scandalous.” Jesus, however, treated women with respect and consideration and was neither racially prejudiced nor gender prejudiced. On the contrary, it was to the Samaritan woman that Jesus for the first time plainly identified himself as the Messiah.​—John 4:7-9, 25, 26.

On another occasion Jesus was approached by a woman who for 12 years had been suffering from an embarrassing and debilitating flow of blood. When she touched him, she was instantly healed. “Jesus turned around and, noticing her, said: ‘Take courage, daughter; your faith has made you well.’” (Matthew 9:22) According to the Mosaic Law, a woman in her condition was not supposed to be in a crowd of people, let alone touch others. Yet, Jesus did not berate her. Rather, he compassionately comforted her and addressed her as “daughter.” How that word must have put her heart at ease! And how happy Jesus must have been to cure her!

no tampon–no toxic shock!

Jesus could have appeared first to Peter, John, or one of the other male disciples. Instead, he dignified women by allowing them to be the first eyewitnesses of his resurrection. An angel instructed them to inform Jesus’ male disciples about this astonishing event. Jesus said to the women: “Go, report to my brothers.” (Matthew 28:1, 5-10)Jesus was certainly not affected by the prejudices common to Jews of his day, according to which women could not serve as legal witnesses.

So, far from being biased against women or condoning chauvinistic attitudes toward them in any way, Jesus showed that he respected and appreciated women. Violence against them was completely contrary to what Jesus taught, and his attitude, we can be sure, was a perfect reflection of the way his Father, Jehovah, sees things.

Women Under Divine Care

“Nowhere in the ancient Mediterranean or Near East were women accorded the freedom that they enjoy in modern Western society. The general pattern was one of subordination of women to men, just as slaves were subordinate to the free, and young to old. . . . Male children were more highly esteemed than female, and baby girls were sometimes left to die by exposure.” That is how one Bible dictionary describes the prevailing attitude toward females in ancient times. In many cases, they were almost put on the same level as slaves.

The Bible was written at a time when customs reflected this attitude. Even so, divine law as expressed in the Bible showed a high regard for women, which was in marked contrast with the attitudes of many ancient cultures.

Jehovah’s concern for the welfare of women is evident from the several instances in which he acted in behalf of his female worshippers. Twice he intervened to protect Abraham’s beautiful wife, Sarah, from being violated. (Genesis 12:14-20; 20:1-7) God showed favor to Jacob’s less-loved wife, Leah, by ‘opening her womb,’ so that she bore a son. (Genesis 29:31, 32) When two God-fearing Israelite midwives risked their lives to preserve Hebrew male children from infanticide in Egypt, Jehovah appreciatively “presented them with families.” (Exodus 1:17, 20, 21) He also answered Hannah’s fervent prayer. (1 Samuel 1:10, 20) And when the widow of a prophet faced a creditor who was about to take her children as slaves to pay off her debt, Jehovah did not leave her in the lurch. Lovingly, God enabled the prophet Elisha to multiply her supply of oil so that she could pay the debt and still have sufficient oil for her family. She thus preserved her family and her dignity.​—Exodus 22:22, 23; 2 Kings 4:1-7.

The prophets repeatedly condemned the exploitation of women or the use of violence against them. The prophet Jeremiah told the Israelites in Jehovah’s name: “Render justice and righteousness, and deliver the one that is being robbed out of the hand of the defrauder; and do not maltreat any alien resident, fatherless boy or widow. Do them no violence. And do not shed any innocent blood in this place.” (Jeremiah 22:2, 3) Later, the rich and powerful in Israel were condemned because they had evicted women from their homes and mistreated their children. (Micah 2:9) The God of justice sees and condemns as evil such suffering caused to women and their children.

The “Capable Wife”

An appropriate view of a capable wife is presented by the ancient writer of the Proverbs. Since this beautiful description of the role and the status of a wife was included in Jehovah’s Word, we can be sure that he approves of it. Far from being oppressed or being viewed as inferior, such a woman is appreciated, respected, and trusted.

The “capable wife” of Proverbs chapter 31 is a vigorous and industrious worker. She works hard at what is “the delight of her hands” and engages in trade and even real estate transactions. She sees a field and proceeds to buy it. She makes undergarments and sells them. She gives belts to the tradesmen. She is vigorous in her strength and activity. Moreover, her words of wisdom and her loving-kindness are greatly appreciated. As a result, she is highly esteemed by her husband, by her sons and, most important, by Jehovah.

Women are not to be the oppressed victims of men who take advantage of them, mistreat them, or subject them to abuse of any kind. Instead, the married woman is to be the happy and accomplished “complement” of her husband.​—Genesis 2:18.

Assigning Honor:

When writing to Christian husbands about how they should treat their wives, the inspired writer Peter urged husbands to imitate the attitudes of Jehovah and Jesus Christ. “You husbands, continue . . . assigning them honor,” he wrote. (1 Peter 3:7) Assigning honor to a person implies that one values and respects such a one highly. Thus, the man who honors his wife does not humiliate her, downgrade her, or treat her violently. Rather, he demonstrates by his words and his deeds​—in public and in private—​that he cherishes and loves her. [excerpted reading reference: How Do God and Christ View Women? Awake! 2008]

{From my own personal study of the scriptures/including various research on commentary (not specifically included in this post)…

i’ve found Jesus to be–Genuinely-Compassionate, Beyond-Genius; an Authentic-Leader way ahead of 1st century and 21st century culture(s)…i.e., in his just treatment of male and female humans as valuable individuals…and in the miraculous manner of care (spiritual/physical) given.}

Aside aside…

Is it a water (adroitly balancing/adeptly working the intangible and tangible in tandem unison) walk where You see less fuzzy and more clearly?? and are able to avoid the here and now obstacles and/or any future obstacles in your immediate step and in your pathway…now and in the future?

Seems so.

When we hit the switch…up or down…we turn on either the tangible lights and off the lights of our perceptions, (faith?) etc.

It takes a grand measure of wisdom, discernment, patience and smarts, incredible abilities, along with cumulative positive traits to distinguish those important/significant times where we need to synthesize discreetly and to act appropriately and in a self-disciplined manner.

Perhaps, some highly-educated spiritual-self-helpers among us/the non-instant gratification seekers…see the wisdom in elevating the intangible over the tangible as a necessary and as being very prudent and very smart in most situations.

μὴnot σκοπούντωνlooking at ἡμῶνof us τὰthe (things) βλεπόμεναbeing seen ἀλλὰbut τὰthe (things) μὴnot βλεπόμενα,being seen, τὰthe (things) γὰρfor βλεπόμεναbeing seen πρόσκαιρα,temporary, τὰthe (things) δὲbut μὴnot βλεπόμεναbeing seen αἰώνια.everlasting.  2 Corinthians 4:18 –The Kingdom Interlinear Translation of the Greek Scriptures

while we keep our eyes, not on the things seen, but on the things unseen. For the things seen are temporary, but the things unseen are everlasting. 2 Corinthians 4:18–New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (Study Edition)

We need our intangible (aka a “convinced” faith) to be a solid, trustworthy, TRUTHFUL/ACCURATE foundation (of mind and heart)…we cannot walk on “rotten planks”…an inferior position.

A convinced faith and mere fantasy are not the same thing! DUH!;)

 

11/07/18 @ 3:02 p.m.

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