Make $$$ Selling Ads

Category Archives: study

Resisting & Surviving Totalitarian Regimes: e.g., Henryk Dornik (et al)

book Breathing-Fragile-Life conscientious-ness courage education Freedom Joan Winifred never giving up! sacrifice & recognition study Truth

Highlighting the Unsung Hero: Henryk Dornik

[…] in August 1944, authorities in a totalitarian regime sent Henryk Dornik and his brother to a concentration camp. However, the opposers acknowledged: “It is impossible to persuade them to do anything. Their martyrdom brings them joy.” Brother Dornik explained: “Although I had no desire to be a martyr, suffering with courage and dignity for my loyalty to Jehovah did bring me joy. . . . Fervent prayers drew me closer to Jehovah, and he proved to be a reliable Helper.” [excerpt: Happy are Those Who Serve The Happy God, w September 2018]

Highlighting a Good ReadBetween Resistance and Martyrdom

“Detlef Garbe’s book takes historical scholarship to new levels of subtlety and sophistication. His insights into the moral and legal resistance mounted by the Witnesses against the Nazis both inside and outside concentration camps are pathbreaking and provocative. All students of persecuted religious minorities are greatly in his debt for bringing to light so much fresh evidence concerning the role of Jehovah’s Witnesses in resisting National Socialism. This is historical investigation of the highest importance and quality.” —James A. Beckford, author of The Trumpet of Prophecy: A Sociological Study of Jehovah’s Witnesses

“Virtually all accounts of the German Church Struggle (including my own) have given very little attention to the Jehovah’s Witnesses, possibly because of denominational bias, or because the numbers involved were relatively few. But this defect has now been splendidly remedied by the appearance of Detlef Garbe’s…book…. Garbe’s excellent history…is the first full treatment of this small [group’s] fate during the Nazi period, combining extensive research into the remaining Nazi records with a sympathetic analysis of survivors’ testimonies. The result is a convincing scholarly description which supersedes all previous accounts.”—John. S. Conway, author of The Nazi Persecution of the Churches, 1933-45

resource: full-list-of-academic-publications/between-resistance-and-martyrdom-jehovahs-witnesses-in-the-third-reich

Highlighting: Domestic Servants & Spiritual/(Conscience) Freedom Fighters:

Many actions of Jehovah’s Witnesses antagonized Nazi authorities. While Witnesses contended that they were apolitical and that their actions were not anti-Nazi, their unwillingness to give the Nazi salute, to join party organizations or to let their children join the Hitler Youth, their refusal to participate in the so-called elections or plebiscites, and their unwillingness to adorn their homes with Nazi flags made them suspect. A special unit of the Gestapo (secret state police) compiled a registry of all persons believed to be Jehovah’s Witnesses. Gestapo agents infiltrated Bible study meetings. While Jehovah’s Witnesses as such were not banned, many of the activities which were basic to the exercise of the faith increasingly came under attack. Above all, the authorities sought to interdict the distribution of printed materials, produced locally or smuggled in from outside the country in large quantities, which in the eyes of the Nazis were clearly subversive.

Conditions in Nazi camps were harsh for all inmates. Many prisoners died from hunger, disease, exhaustion, exposure to the cold, and brutal treatment. Incarcerated Jehovah’s Witnesses were sustained by the support they gave each other and by their belief that their suffering was part of their work for God. Individual Witnesses astounded guards with their refusal to conform to military-type routines like roll call or roll bandages for soldiers at the front. At the same time, camp authorities considered Witnesses to be relatively trustworthy because they refused to escape or physically resist their guards. For this reason, Nazi camp officers and guards often used Witnesses as domestic servants. [excerpt & Further Reading: encyclopedia.ushmm.org ]

Highlighting: Anathema to Nazi police state:

After the Nazis came to power, persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses intensified. Witnesses believed themselves to belong to Jehovah’s Kingdom and considered all worldly powers unwitting allies of Satan. They refused to swear loyalty to the Nazi regime. Moreover, their international theological and organizational contacts were anathema to the Nazi police state. Initially, Witness indifference to the Nazi state manifested itself in the refusal to raise their arms in the Heil Hitler salute, join the German Labor Front (which all salaried and wage workers were forced to join after the Nazis outlawed trade unions), participate in Nazi welfare collections, and vote in elections. Likewise they would not participate in Nazi rallies and parades.

Nazi authorities denounced Jehovah’s Witnesses for their ties to the United States and derided the apparent revolutionary millennialism of their preaching that a battle of Armageddon would precede the rule of Christ on earth as part of God’s plan. They linked Jehovah’s Witnesses to the Nazi idea of “international Jewry” by pointing to Witness reliance on certain Old Testament texts. The Nazis had grievances with many of the smaller Protestant groups on these issues, but only the Jehovah’s Witnesses refused to bear arms or swear loyalty to the state. [excerpted & further reading: jehovahs-witnesses-in-germany-from-the-1890s-to-the-1930s]

If one wishes to successfully resist and/or survive any tyranny…or any totalitarian regime (and its methods)…

should (case) study: the JW’s.

 

11/18/18 @ 1:41 p.m.

Published by:

Dim Nimrod

education insights Joan Winifred mind food sovereignty spiritual food study things i learned transformation True v. False Religion wisdom

“Don’t be a Nimrod!”…an expression back in the day (among the goofy-geeky, spiritually-disciplined (i.e. me & co)).

DIM!…life, eh?

exciting(?) trouble(?)
Choosing my battles…the better fight IS spiritual! Personally, i’d rather self-discipline…less embarrassing and costly than some outside (harsh? cruel?) source administering. i get my “(k)nickel” back…and i can learn from and/or listen to “a” tune…somebody else’s…doesn’t mean i have to touch the fire to know it hurts. (Not that i enJOY watching others burn.)

Through “accurate” knowledge/example/education…through “Bible” education specifically…it’s a privilege to pull Others out of the fire…sometimes.

Other times…it’s basic spiritual-palliative-care.

(You try to share something positive that will comfort.)

That’s why education is so important (and to me). On-going, life-long…love lessons…proper-appropriate love of self, neighbor, family, community, global-brotherhood-of-humanity.

Daily Bible study/meditation/application…has disciplined me through the years from youth to almost 50.

Yep, obviously, IF YOU:) regularly read my ramblings..still have lots to learn on various topics not just Biblical. And that’s “really” EXCITING!…the learning/changing process..means i am always on the move…and not stagnant and festering aka rotting/corrupting away. (Some day this caterpillar may be a butterfly:))

a daily-healthy (spiritual, mental, emotional, etc.) Re

NEW

al.

It’s a NEW day, and i am a NEW person. 🙂

i mean to be AGGRAVATING;) HA!…some reading about Nimrod, Tammuz..(Marduk is a FALSE “god” BTW).

You got the guts to read, right?!

22. With whom does the book The Two Babylons identify Tammuz?

22 However, in his book entitled “The Two Babylons” Dr. Alexander Hislop identifies Tammuz with Nimrod, the founder of the city of Babylon, about 180 years after the flood of Noah’s day.

23. Who, Biblically, was Nimrod, what did his followers do about him after his death, and how do the mythical characters Bacchus and Adonis correspond with him?

23 Nimrod was the great-grandson of Noah. According to Genesis 10:1, 6, 8-12Nimrod became known as “a mighty hunter in opposition to Jehovah.” According to religious tradition, Nimrod was executed for his rebelliousness against Jehovah, the God of Noah. Nimrod’s followers considered his violent death a tragedy or calamity, and deified him. Annually they memorialized his death on the first or second day of the lunar month Tammuz, when the idolatrous women wept over his idol. So among the ancient classical writers he was given the name Bacchus, which means “Bewept One,” “Lamented One.” This weeping over him corresponds with that carried on over the legendary Adonis, a beautiful youth who was loved by Venus or Ishtar and who was killed by a wild boar in the mountains of Lebanon. In fact, the Latin Vulgate Bible and the English Douay Version Bible use the name Adonis instead of Tammuz in Ezekiel 8:14: “Behold women sat there mourning for Adonis,” or, “Lord.”

24. What derivations have been given for the name Tammuz, what letter became a symbol of him, and why was it scandalous for women to bewail Tammuz in Jehovah’s temple?

24 The Two Babylons (page 245, footnote) derives the name Tammuz from the words tam (“to make perfect”) and muz (“fire”) so as to mean “Perfecting Fire” or “Fire the Perfecter.” Another derivation gives it the meaning “Hidden” or “Obscure,” and this corresponds with the fact that the worship of the image of Tammuz was carried on in a secret place, as pictured at Ezekiel 8:14. He was represented by the first letter of his name, which is an ancient tau, that was a cross. The “sign of the cross” was the religious symbol of Tammuz. So there was an attempt to introduce the worship of the idolatrous pagan cross into the temple of Jehovah at Jerusalem. How scandalous it was for those Israelite women, on the pavement of the inner court of Jehovah’s temple, to be religiously weeping over the executional death of Tammuz, in reality over “Nimrod a mighty hunter in opposition to Jehovah”!

25. According to Genesis 10:10-12Nimrod was a founder of what, and what type of religion stems from the “beginning of his kingdom”?

25 What today in Christendom, since its founding in the fourth century by Roman Emperor Constantine the Great, derives itself from all religious things having to do with Nimrodalias Tammuz? Let us bear in mind that “the beginning of his kingdom came to be Babel [or Babylon] and Erech and Accad and Calneh, in the land of Shinar. Out of that land he went forth into Assyria and set himself to building Nineveh and Rehoboth-Ir and Calah and Resen between Nineveh and Calah: this is the great city.” (Genesis 10:10-12) Thus Nimrod was the founder of cities and of political systems of rule, contrary to the will of Jehovah God. All false religion stemmed from Babylon after the flood of the days of Noah. Genesis 10:8, 9 says that “he [Nimrod] displayed himself a mighty hunter in opposition to Jehovah.”

26. According to the Babylonian and Assyrian custom of applying the word “hunter,” in what way was Nimrod a shedder of blood?

26 The term “hunting,” according to the ancient Babylonian and Assyrian custom, was applied not only to hunting for wild animals but also to military campaigns against human creatures as the prey. So Nimrod made himself a shedder of human blood in warfare.

27. What has Christendom done as regards setting up religious systems, and how has she not confined herself to religion purely as her realm?

27 How well these details about Nimrod fit also to Christendom! Like Nimrod, she also has established her own religious systems. These are generally thought of as being in harmony with the Holy Bible of Jehovah but in actuality being in harmony with religious teachings of ancient Babylon, including the adoration of the cross, the symbol of Tammuz. Like Nimrod, Christendom has not confined herself to religion purely; she has mixed herself in worldly politics, setting up, wherever possible, a union of Church and State, with the Church trying to tell the State what to do. She has claimed that her political emperors and kings have ruled “By the grace of God.” Even her bishops, archbishops and popes have been honored with material thrones and are still said to “reign” over their bishoprics and papal sees.

28. How have the politicians been favored by Christendom, and how has she gone contrary politically to the words and example of Jesus Christ?

28 The politicians of this world are given prominent positions and considerations in the church systems. What a contrast this to the example of Jesus Christ, who refused to be made a king on earth by men! To the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, he said: “My kingdom is no part of this world. If my kingdom were part of this world, my attendants would have fought that I should not be delivered up to the Jews. But, as it is, my kingdom is not from this source.” (John 18:36) To the contrary of this, Christendom insists that it is the duty of her church members to engage in politics. At times and in some places, she endeavors to dictate to them as to the political candidates for whom they shall cast their election ballots. Members of her clergy have even acted as political rulers, as president, or prime minister, and so on.

29. How does Christendom find in Nimrod the “mighty hunter” a small prototype of herself as regards bloodshed?

29 And what about wanton bloodshed as committed by “Nimrod a mighty hunter in opposition to Jehovah”? Nimrod was merely a small prototype for Christendom! She too has engaged as a “hunter” in military campaigns with carnal weapons. The most sanguinary wars of all human history have been waged by the members of Christendom, between themselves and with the so-called infidels and pagans. All this is not Christlike. It is Babylonish and smacks of Nimrod.

30. How have the wars of Christendom caused further weeping on the part of the womenfolk and the paying of special respects by the churches to high-ranking war figures?

30 The loss of human lives in these wars has caused untold weeping by the womenfolk of Christendom. Memorial days are held annually when the ones bereaved by war go to the graveyards to decorate the burial plots of their slain warriors. The deaths of the mighty war generals and other high-ranking warlords are mourned by the patriotic, nationalistic members of Christendom, these being eulogized in the churches in which the funeral services are held. All this in full agreement with the notorious fact that churches have been used as recruiting stations and propaganda centers in times of war. Such connecting up of all these political and military doings with the “house of God” (the Church) in Christendom well reminds us of those Israelite women sitting and weeping over Tammuz inside the inner court of the temple of the Sovereign Lord God in Ezekiel’s day. [excerpted: Detestable Religious Things over Which to Sigh, Kj chap. 8]

“Kingdom of God”…excerpted: Insight on Scriptures, Vol. 2:

The term “king” (Heb., meʹlekh) evidently came into use in human language after the global Flood. The first earthly kingdom was that of Nimrod “a mighty hunter in opposition to Jehovah.” (Ge 10:8-12) Thereafter, during the period down to Abraham’s time, city-states and nations developed and human kings multiplied. With the exception of the kingdom of Melchizedek, king-priest of Salem (who served as a prophetic type of the Messiah [Ge 14:17-20; Heb 7:1-17]), none of these earthly kingdoms represented God’s rule or were established by him. Men also made kings of the false gods they worshiped, attributing to them the ability to grant power of rulership to humans. Jehovah’s application of the title “King [Meʹlekh]” to himself, as found in the post-Flood writings of the Hebrew Scriptures, therefore meant God’s making use of the title men had developed and employed. God’s use of the term showed that he, and not presumptuous human rulers or man-made gods, should be looked to and obeyed as “King.”​—Jer 10:10-12.

Jehovah had, of course, been Sovereign Ruler long before human kingdoms developed, in fact before humans existed. As the true God and as their Creator, he was respected and obeyed by angelic sons numbering into the millions. (Job 38:4-7; 2Ch 18:18; Ps 103:20-22; Da 7:10) By whatever title, then, he was, from the beginning of creation, recognized as the One whose will was rightfully supreme.

God’s Rulership in Early Human History. The first human creatures, Adam and Eve, likewise knew Jehovah as God, the Creator of heaven and earth. They recognized his authority and his right to issue commands, to call upon people to perform certain duties or to refrain from certain acts, to assign land for residence and cultivation, as well as to delegate authority over others of his creatures. (Ge 1:26-30; 2:15-17) Though Adam had the ability to coin words (Ge 2:19, 20), there is no evidence that he developed the title “king [meʹlekh]” to apply it to his God and Creator, although he recognized Jehovah’s supreme authority.

As revealed in the initial chapters of Genesis, God’s exercise of his sovereignty toward man in Eden was benevolent and not unduly restrictive. The relationship between God and man called for obedience such as the obedience a son renders to his father. (Compare Lu 3:38.) Man had no lengthy code of laws to fulfill (compare 1Ti 1:8-11); God’s requirements were simple and purposeful. Nor is there anything to indicate that Adam was made to feel inhibited by constant, critical supervision of his every action; rather, God’s communication with perfect man seems to have been periodic, according to need.​—Ge chaps 1-3.

A new expression of God’s rulership purposed. The first human pair’s open violation of God’s command, instigated by one of God’s spirit sons, was actually rebellion against divine authority. (Ge 3:17-19; see TREES [Figurative Use].) The position taken by God’s spirit Adversary (Heb., sa·tanʹ) constituted a challenge calling for a test, the issue being the rightfulness of Jehovah’s universal sovereignty. (See JEHOVAH [The supreme issue a moral one].) The earth, where the issue was raised, is fittingly the place where it will be settled.​—Re 12:7-12.

At the time of pronouncing judgment upon the first rebels, Jehovah God spoke a prophecy, couched in symbolic phrase, setting forth his purpose to use an agency, a “seed,” to effect the ultimate crushing of the rebel forces. (Ge 3:15) Thus, Jehovah’s rulership, the expression of his sovereignty, would take on a new aspect or expression in answer to the insurrection that had developed. The progressive revelation of “the sacred secrets of the kingdom” (Mt 13:11) showed that this new aspect would involve the formation of a subsidiary government, a ruling body headed by a deputy ruler. The realization of the promise of the “seed” is in the kingdom of Christ Jesus in union with his chosen associates. (Re 17:14; see JESUS CHRIST [His Vital Place in God’s Purpose].) From the time of the Edenic promise forward, the progressive development of God’s purpose to produce this Kingdom “seed” becomes a basic theme of the Bible and a key to understanding Jehovah’s actions toward his servants and toward mankind in general.

Lots of reading here w/links…to some of my favorite books: Insight on Scriptures, Vol. 1 & 2…excellent!

Happy Saturday & Peace Patient Reader …Thank You for not being a Nimrod!:)

11/17/18 @ 12:26 p.m.

Published by:

on my side

Breathing-Fragile-Life choice contentment courage forgiveness God healing hope Hope humility insights Joan Winifred justice lamentations of the heart leadership never giving up! patience positive qualities power prisoners questions reality sovereignty spiritual food study Transformations trust Truth

IF there is an “ALMIGHTY” God/Ultimate Designer/Architect of the Universe/Creator of Man & Earth/Yahweh/Supreme Sovereign/Maker of TREES…True God of LOVE…”s–l–o–w to anger and  a       b     u     n      d      a      n    t      in loving-kindness”…merciful and Freely Forgiving…:) who cannot lie!!…

do i want “Him” on MY side??!

there are frequent/rare times in life…when over/underwhelmed, betrayed, rejected, bored…lonely, lost, depressed, sick, sad, grieving…tortuous to the soul/tough times; all of us have faced these in varying lengths and in varying degrees/forms…for me, just “thinking” , approaching life/challenges/disasters/disappointments/death differently/(outside typical boxes) from Others: for example, obviously—IF You read my blog—i tend to be more spiritually minded v. secularly/academically/mathematically/materially minded..etc..my meditation/analization processes tilt toward..(spirituality)…Spiritual/Biblical Truth…my obsession.

it’s the stable/anchor place of deeply satisfying-comforting answers that completely/repetely nourish my mind/heart/kidneys and which make the most sense to imperfect-limited me.

a Biblical character i admire a lot…”Joseph”…an excerpted article: check it out IF YOU:) so choose: “Please Listen to This Dream w August 2014:

How did Joseph get into such a terrible predicament? And what can we learn from the faith of a young man who was victimized and rejected by members of his own family?

Joseph came from a very large family​—but not a happy and united one. The Bible’s portrait of Jacob’s family stands as vivid proof of the negative effects of polygamy​—an entrenched practice that God tolerated among his people until his Son restored the original standard of monogamy. (Matthew 19:4-6) Jacob had at least 14 children by four different women​—his two wives, Leah and Rachel, and their maidservants, Zilpah and Bilhah. From the start, Jacob was in love with his beautiful Rachel. He never felt such an attachment to Leah, Rachel’s older sister, whom he had been tricked into marrying. A bitter rivalry persisted between the two women, and that jealousy carried  over to the children of the household.​—Genesis 29:16-35; 30:1, 8, 19, 20; 37:35.

Rachel was barren for a long time, and when she finally gave birth to Joseph, Jacob treated this son of his old age as special. For example, when the family were on their way to a dangerous meeting with Jacob’s murderous brother, Esau, Jacob made sure that Rachel and little Joseph were given the safest position at the rear of the household group. That tense day must have made a deep impression on Joseph. Imagine how he felt that morning as he wondered, wide-eyed, why his aged but vigorous father was now walking with a limp. How amazed he must have been to learn the reason: His father had struggled the night before with a mighty angel! And why? Because Jacob wanted a blessing from Jehovah God. Jacob’s reward was the change of his name to Israel. A whole nation would bear his name! (Genesis 32:22-31) In time, Joseph learned that the sons of Israel were to father the tribes of that nation!

Later, young Joseph faced tragedy firsthand when the dearest person in his young life left him all too soon. His mother died while giving birth to his younger brother, Benjamin. His father grieved deeply over the loss. Imagine Jacob gently wiping the tears from Joseph’s eyes, comforting him with the same hope that had once comforted Jacob’s grandfather Abraham. How touched Joseph must have been to learn that Jehovah would one day restore his mother to life! Perhaps Joseph came to have even deeper love for the generous “God . . . of the living.” (Luke 20:38; Hebrews 11:17-19) In the wake of the loss of his wife, Jacob always had tender feelings for those two boys, his sons by Rachel.​—Genesis 35:18-20;37:3; 44:27-29.

Many children would be spoiled or corrupted by such special treatment; but Joseph learned from the many good qualities of his parents, and he developed strong faith as well as a keen sense of right and wrong. At the age of 17, he was working as a shepherd, assisting some of his older brothers, when he noticed some wrongdoing on their part. Was he tempted to keep the matter quiet so as to gain their favor? In any case, he did what was right. He reported the matter to his father. (Genesis 37:2) Perhaps that brave act confirmed Jacob’s high opinion of this beloved son. What an excellent example for […] youths to think about! When tempted to conceal the serious sin of another​—perhaps a sibling or a friend—​it is wise to imitate Joseph and make sure that the matter is known to those who are in a position to help the wrongdoer.​—Leviticus 5:1.

Perhaps because of Joseph’s courageous stand for what was right, Jacob bestowed an honor on the boy. He had a special garment made for his son. (Genesis 37:3) It has often been called a striped coat or a coat of many colors, but there is scant evidence for such renderings. Likely, it was a long, elegant robe, perhaps reaching to the extremities of the arms and legs. It was probably the kind of garb that a nobleman or a prince might wear.

“When his brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers, they began to hate him, and they could not speak peaceably to him.”  (Genesis 37:4) Their jealousy may be understandable, but Joseph’s brothers were unwise to give in to that poisonous emotion. (Proverbs 14:30; 27:4) Have you ever found yourself seething with envy when someone received attention or honor that you wanted? Remember Joseph’s brothers. Their jealousy led them to commit deeds that they would come to regret deeply. Their example serves to remind Christians that it is far wiser to “rejoice with those who rejoice.”​—Romans 12:15.

Joseph surely sensed his brothers’ animosity. So did he stash his fancy robe out of sight when his brothers were near? He might have been tempted to do so. Remember, though, that Jacob wanted the robe to be a sign of favor and love. Joseph wanted to live up to his father’s trust in him, so he loyally wore the garment. His example is useful for us. Although our own heavenly Father is never partial, he does at times single out  his loyal servants and favor them. Furthermore, he asks them to stand out as different from this corrupt and immoral world. Like Joseph’s special robe, the conduct of true Christians makes them different from those around them. Such conduct sometimes incites jealousy and animosity. (1 Peter 4:4) Should a Christian hide his true identity as a servant of God? No​—no more than Joseph should have hidden his robe.​—Luke 11:33.

a dreamer of dreams…

It was not long before Joseph had two extraordinary dreams. In the first dream, Joseph saw himself and his brothers, each binding a sheaf of grain. But then his brothers’ sheaves encircled his sheaf and bowed down to it as it stood erect. In the second dream, the sun, the moon, and 11 stars were bowing down to Joseph. (Genesis 37:6, 7, 9) What should Joseph do about those strange and vivid dreams?

The dreams came from Jehovah God. They were prophetic in nature, and God meant for Joseph to pass along the message they contained. In a sense, Joseph was to do what all the later prophets did when they related God’s messages and judgments to His wayward people.

Joseph tactfully said to his brothers: “Please listen to this dream that I had.” His brothers understood the dream, and they did not like it one bit. They answered: “Are you really going to make yourself king over us and dominate us?” The account adds: “So they found another reason to hate him, because of his dreams and what he said.” When Joseph related the second dream to his father as well as his brothers, the reaction was not much better. We read: “His father rebuked him and said to him: ‘What is the meaning of this dream of yours? Am I as well as your mother and your brothers really going to come and bow down to the earth to you?’” However, Jacob kept thinking the matter over. Might (Yahweh) Jehovah be communicating with the boy?​—Genesis 37:6, 8, 10, 11.

HATED…Ouchy-wawa! 🙁

Not long afterward, Jacob sent young Joseph on a journey. The older sons were tending the flocks up north near Shechem, where they had recently made bitter enemies. Naturally, Jacob was concerned about his sons, so he sent Joseph to check on their welfare. Can you imagine Joseph’s feelings? He knew that his brothers hated him more than ever! How would they like it when he came to them as their father’s spokesman? Nonetheless, Joseph obediently set out.​—Genesis 34:25-30; 37:12-14.

It was quite a trek​—in all, perhaps four or five days of walking. Shechem lay about 50 miles (80 km) to the north of Hebron. But at Shechem, Joseph learned that his brothers had moved on to Dothan, which lay another 14 miles (22 km) or so to the north. When Joseph finally neared Dothan, his brothers saw him coming from a distance. Immediately their hatred boiled to the surface. The account reads: “They said to one another: ‘Look! Here comes that dreamer. Come, now, let us kill him and pitch him into one of the waterpits, and we will say that a vicious wild animal devoured him. Then let us see what will become of his dreams.’” Reuben, however, persuaded his brothers to throw Joseph into a pit alive, hoping that he could rescue the boy later on.​—Genesis 37:19-22.

Unsuspecting, Joseph approached them, no doubt hoping for a peaceful meeting. Instead, his brothers attacked him! Roughly, they stripped off his special robe, dragged him to a dried-out waterpit, and pushed him in. Down Joseph fell! Recovering from the shock, he struggled to his feet, but he could never climb out on his own. He saw only a circle of sky as his brothers’ voices receded. He cried out to them, pleading, but they ignored him. Callously, they ate a meal nearby. While Reuben was absent, they again considered killing the boy, but Judah persuaded them to sell him to passing merchants instead. Dothan was near the trade route to Egypt, and it was not long before a caravan of Ishmaelites and Midianites came by. Before Reuben returned, the deed was done. For 20 shekels, they had sold their brother as a slave.​—Genesis 37:23-28; 42:21.

As Joseph was taken south along the road to Egypt, he seemed to have lost everything. He was cut off! For years, he would know nothing of his family​—nothing of Reuben’s anguish when he returned to find Joseph gone; nothing of Jacob’s grief when he was deceived into believing that his beloved Joseph was dead; nothing of his aged grandfather Isaac, who still lived; and nothing of his beloved younger brother, Benjamin, whom he would miss dearly. But was Joseph left with nothing at all?​—Genesis 37:29-35.

Joseph still had something that his brothers could never take from him: faith. He knew much about his God, Yahweh/Jehovah, and nothing could rob him of that​—not the loss of his home, not the hardships of captivity on the long journey to Egypt, and not even the humiliation of being sold as a slave to a wealthy Egyptian named Potiphar. (Genesis 37:36) Joseph’s faith and his determination to stay close to his God only grew stronger through such hardships.

It’s very commendable (and imitation worthy from my POV) Joseph never gave up hope, never became bitter; nor haughty when put in a powerful position, “Avrekh” , 2nd to Pharaoh…He didn’t retaliate, seek revenge/compensation for years of unjustly suffering…Amazing!! Joseph “continued” loving his Brothers (aka jealous enemies in His own household) exercising patience…which provided them opportunity for positive transformation. He forgave his brothers. Preserving many lives!

i like this song and video about Joseph:

questions for reflections:
what are my personal/individual hardships growing in me?!
negatives?! positives?!

am i getting bitter or better?!

am i being patient?

forgiving?

how will “accurate” faith/knowledge/Truth, forgiveness, hope, humility, gratitude,

God!…

get me through the ups and downs/the highs and lows

the reality of this fleeting/fast-paced life?

(whom does one turn to when even your own brothers/family hate/are against You?! How about God??)

p.s. life lesson:  don’t hate (nor love?) the messenger, eh?! 😉

Good Night/Good Day to You Reader:)

11/15/18 @ 12:16 a.m.

p.p.s.

I AM NOT ALONE!!! 

🙂

Published by:

hate and murder…OUCH! tough? topics

attitude communication conscientious-ness forgiveness healing insights Joan Winifred logic mind food patience peace spiritual food stress management study things i learned wisdom

Humans’ laws…do they get to the root of a problem? Can they rid us of hate? Can they stop murder?

IDK, couple weeks back?…was meaning to write on this topic, but i have a lot swirling in my brain and in my life…Yeah, i do have a life…(outside of this post/writing time)…major and minor responsibilities every day of which to tend…conscientiously. Plus, (too) long (for this post) story short, not always able to access computer for writing lately…my favorite device died-UGH!!:( …and haven’t made time nor opportunity to figure out/nor fix/resurrect my surface. i hate (aka strongly dislike) technology fails..especially when i am in an about to crash-wave of ultra-busyness and no-time-to-stop-or-i-may-drown…No, i am not putting my full confidence in technology! NOPE.;)

Enough explaining…(and complaining;)…back to topic under consideration/discussion: an oldie excerpt for reading: (my blue highlights)

God’s Word also counsels us not to cherish resentment, not to carry “internalized hatreds” around with us. It tells us that to ‘hate our brother is to be a murderer and that no murderer will gain eternal life.’ “You must not hate your brother in your heart.” “Let not the sun set with you in a provoked state.” (1 John 3:15; Lev. 19:17; Eph. 4:26NW) Hostility or personal hatred is actually a form of rebellion. It represents a desire to punish another, to work injury. It is unwilling to wait upon Jehovah to make an accounting but wants to take the law into its own hands. Note how this is brought to our attention in Moses’ law, which, by the way, also shows us what the remedy is: “You must not take vengeance nor have a grudge against the sons of your people; and you must love your fellow as yourself.” Rather than returning kind for kind we are instructed, “Continue to love your enemies, to do good to those hating you, to bless those cursing you.”—Lev. 19:18;Luke 6:27, 28NW. [Scriptural Aspect of Psychosomatic Medicine W 1954, 4/15 p. 236]

When we refuse to forgive a friend or enemy…it’s damaging to ourselves. Jesus and Moses get to the root of murder…a hateful/vengeful attitude/grudge/disposition toward someone…(not talking toward the something aka hurtful/bad/wrong behavior of said someone)…some who take the law into their own hands…act worse than the so-called perpetrator.  And IF we maintain/harbor a hate toward the someone say in our life…we may just cut off communication and association with said person…in effect…making them dead to us.

No communicating/associating with…the dead, eh?!

And honestly communicating before resentment and hatred take over a relationship…keep it a live…living…working on peace.

Work is life.

The scriptures have been a true friend to me…offering wise words…keeping me healthy…on a multi-wellness path. (God, i am such a geek!! an outsider to some)

this post is not how i planned it…(i’m tired, etc., etc., etc.)…You know what???

stop reading my post(s)…and start reading the Bible…(it’s written MUCH better and MORE worth Your time).

peace

BYE

10/1/18 @ 9:09 p.m.

p.s.

bye

 

 

 

 

Published by:
Make $$$ Selling Ads