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Category Archives: Truth

Judaism, Christendom, and Islam

conscientious-ness insights Joan Winifred Truth

Do i believe in the doctrine of the immortality of the soul?

All three: Judaism, Christendom, and Islam teach it.

Ideas & TRUTH…the same thing?!😉

excerpted reading:  The idea enters

22 The idea of the immortality of the soul in Judaism and Christendom appeared because of Platonic influence, but the concept was built into Islam from its beginning. This is not to say that Arab scholars have not tried to synthesize Islamic teachings and Greek philosophy. The Arab world, in fact, was greatly influenced by Aristotle’s work. And noted Arab scholars, such as Avicenna and Averroës, expounded and built on Aristotelian thinking. In their attempts to harmonize Greek thought with the Muslim teaching about the soul, however, they came up with differing theories. For example, Avicenna declared that the personal soul is immortal. Averroës, on the other hand, argued against that view. Regardless of these viewpoints, the immortality of the soul remains the belief of Muslims. (my re(a)d highlights)

Q: uestion(s) for reflection(s)…

what ideas are entering my mind?

am i accurately distinguishing between “ideas” “speculations “theories” and TRUTH?!

Happy TRUTH Finding For You Reader:)

 

6/15/18 @ 6:05 p.m.

 

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(Happy) Happy–a Sunday Song

Breathing-Fragile-Life insights Joan Winifred trust Truth

Happy? (more? or less?)

love & respect: 2 big CONTRIBUTORS to happiness within relationships/families…aka (we)

“And God went on to create the man in his image, in God’s image he created him; male and female he created them.” (Genesis 1:27)

{Handel’s Acis & Galatea considered by? (musicologists) some to be the “greatest pastoral opera” –Stanley Sadie}

Guess, one (namely me) could think of Genesis…starting specifically @ place/time (pre) -“Garden of Eden” and all that occurred therein Garden and post-Eden…as a living progressive (Pastoral/Seria/Verismo) Opera…still playing on…musically, etc. throughout the centuries. The Libretto aka “little library of 66 books”…leading us along…through time/space/place culminating in finale “Armageddon” and beyond.

If 1 bouquet symbolizes love…what does a field of flowers (symbolize)?? If 1 paper card symbolizes love, what does a forest of trees?? If 1 teddy bear holding 1 box of chocolates says: “I love You”…what do real-live bears eating honey mean?? (Makes 1 wonder: Could these be “love” expressions from the Creator/Designer-Organizer of the Universe?!:)

When men and women learn to appreciate each unique/important role—male and female—individually play in the human family/musical/opera of life, we find contentment/happiness. When males and females cooperate, appreciate, love, and respect each other…peace ensues…instead of competing for dominance, prominence and for who’s the greatest…

Man: The highest form of earthly life and a product of the Creator, Jehovah God. Jehovah formed the man out of dust from the ground, blew into his nostrils the breath of life, “and the man came to be a living soul.” (Ge 2:7; 1Co 15:45) After Adam was created and after he named the animals, Jehovah caused a deep sleep to fall upon him; and while he slept, God took one of Adam’s ribs and used it to make the woman. Therefore, when she was presented to the man, Adam could say: “This is at last bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh.” He called her Woman, ʼish·shahʹ, “because from man this one was taken.” (Ge 2:21-23) Adam later gave her the name Eve (meaning “Living One”).​—Ge 3:20.

A number of Hebrew and Greek terms refer to man. ʼA·dhamʹ means “man; human; earthling man; mankind” (generic); ʼish, “man; an individual; a husband”; ʼenohshʹ, “a mortal man”; geʹver, “an able-bodied man”; za·kharʹ, “a male”; a few other Hebrew words are also sometimes translated “man.” The Greek anʹthro·pos means “man; mankind” (generic); a·nerʹ, “a man; a male person; a husband.”

In what sense is man made “in God’s image”?

In disclosing to his “master worker” the divine purpose to create mankind, God said: “Let us make man [ʼa·dhamʹ] in our image, according to our likeness.” (Ge 1:26, 27; Pr 8:30, 31; compare Joh 1:1-3; Col 1:15-17.) Note that the Scriptures do not say that God created man in the image of a wild beast or of a domestic animal or of a fish. Man was made “in God’s image”; he was a “son of God.” (Lu 3:38) As to the form or shape of God’s body, “at no time has anyone beheld God.” (1Jo 4:12) No one on earth knows what God’s glorious, heavenly, spiritual body looks like, so we cannot liken man’s body to God’s body. “God is a Spirit.”​—Joh 4:24.

Nevertheless, man is “in God’s image” in that he was created with moral qualities like those of God, namely, love and justice. (Compare Col 3:10.) He also has powers and wisdom above those of animals, so that he can appreciate the things that God enjoys and appreciates, such as beauty and the arts, speaking, reasoning, and similar processes of the mind and heart of which the animals are not capable. Moreover, man is capable of spirituality, of knowing and having communication with God. (1Co 2:11-16; Heb 12:9) For such reasons man was qualified to be God’s representative and to have in subjection the forms of creature life in the skies, on the earth, and in the sea.

Testifying to man’s creation by Jehovah God, the apostle Paul told the Athenians: “He made out of one man every nation of men, to dwell upon the entire surface of the earth.” (Ac 17:26) Hence, all nations and races have a common origin.

Headship arrangement aka theocratic order/(organization)…

Being a creation of God, man was originally perfect. (De 32:4) Accordingly, Adam could have bequeathed to his posterity human perfection and opportunity for eternal life on earth. (Isa 45:18) He and Eve were commanded: “Be fruitful and become many and fill the earth and subdue it.” As their family increased, they would have cultivated and beautified the earth according to the design of their Creator.​—Ge 1:28.

The apostle Paul, in discussing the relative positions of man and woman in God’s arrangement, says: “I want you to know that the head of every man is the Christ; in turn the head of a woman is the man; in turn the head of the Christ is God.” He then points out that a woman who prays or prophesies in the congregation with her head uncovered shames the one who is her head. To enforce his argument he then states: “For a man ought not to have his head covered, as he is God’s image and glory; but the woman is man’s glory.” Man was created first and for some time was alone, being in God’s image by himself. The woman was made from the man and was to be subject to the man, a situation unlike that of God, who is subject to no one. Man’s headship, nevertheless, comes under the headship of God and Christ.​—1Co 11:3-7.

A Free Moral Agent. Being made in God’s image, according to His likeness, man was a free moral agent. He had the freedom of choice to do good or bad. By his willing, loving obedience to his Creator, he was in a position to bring honor and glory to God far beyond that which the animal creation could bring. He could intelligently praise God for His wonderful qualities and could support His sovereignty. But Adam’s freedom was a relative freedom; it was not absolute. He could continue to live in happiness only if he acknowledged Jehovah’s sovereignty. This was indicated by the tree of knowledge of good and bad, from which Adam was forbidden to eat. Eating of it would be an act of disobedience, a rebellion against God’s sovereignty.​—Ge 2:9, 16, 17.

Since Adam was a “son of God” (Lu 3:38), his relationship to God was that of a son to a father, and he should have obeyed accordingly. Additionally, God created in man an innate desire to render worship. This desire, if perverted, would take man in the wrong direction and would destroy his freedom, bringing him into bondage to what was created instead of to the Creator. This, in turn, would result in man’s degradation. [excerpted readings Man, Insight Vol., 2]

G considering/thinking about “bondage”…of one sort/form or another…some of us…have the real “smarts” “insights” “fearlessness” to avoid (and perhaps, altogether) certain places of (the immediate and the future) bondage to begin with…i.e. fake government, fake religion, fake education, and fake relationships! And some of us (perhaps, through the hard lessons of pain, anguish, agony) have the acquired know-how and courage to flee such places before they inflict further harm on themselves or others!

 

published Monday, 6/9/18 @ 11:48 a.m.

male and female instead of male vs. female or female vs. male…topic for another post, eh? Ran out of time…and energy last night to continue.

HAPPY Monday to YOU:)

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(Spineless??) (Mind) Contortionist(s)?! hmmmm

courage dance faith insights Joan Winifred mind food spiritual food study trust Truth

PLEASE READ & THINK AT YOUR OWN RISK…of g~e~n~t~l~y stretching/(exercising within reason) Your Own Mind—Your Own Power(s) of Reason:)

Thinking about: flexibility, hypermobility, and contortion–differing phenomena…and any long-term damage to spine….may be? (mind) front benders and back benders…are spineless? or have damaged consciences? or a damaged consciousness? or are dangerously/fatally indecisive?? or too wishy-washy??  Or just exercising their particular mind-range-of-motion…also, thinking about (mind) performing arts…(i.e. enterology—squeezing one’s body into a small box).

(Mind) boxes various minds stuff themselves in; crowded.

Bodies have healthy/reasonable limits of movement/actions and so? should minds, eh?…to remain healthy & safe, etc. FIT!

Some bodies are more flexible than others…minds…move, moving…

Being a healthy, flexible/open-minded s–t–r–e–t–c–h–y thinker is one thing…however, too much over-stretching can be damaging & dangerous in my P.O.V.

Just doing some “surface” thinking…seems like IF …too overly-rigid or too overly-stretched-out brain..lol…mind …

elastic waist bands serve a purpose!…suppose to hold up your pants/skirt!…yet, when the waist band doesn’t snap back…is over-stretched…it’s not working properly, right?  Yeah, thinking/reading (briefly tonight) about neural plasticity…strengthening and weakening…and shaping, structure, function..(a fascinating subject/topic for me, however, secondary to spiritual topics which i prioritize)…

tests of faith arise, (tests of elasticity? snapping, breaking, stretching abilities/growth) etc. Anyway…these above-mentioned thoughts bring me to this:

Backbone of FAITH and COURAGE based on (sufficient “accurate” knowledge (doesn’t always include every minute detail)) needed for “stability” and spiritually-active-life-saving-decisiveness, eh?

Abraham certainly had backbone!! Not a coward… and not disagreeable!… actually, his test was more of an agreeable test of… “willingly” performing the seemingly “disagreeable” act/sacrifice. Why would he willingly do such an act?

Whose gonna have the last laugh?? (The faith FULL?)…(beware of mind poison, huh?;)

Abraham had already built up his immunity (his FAITH) in God/”true” salvation and the resurrection…(HOPE)

He foreshadowed what God himself was willing and would do in offering up (his beloved son Isaac on altar) for all of humanity…Jesus Christ–God’s Son.

Interesting reading on subject: Abraham, Faith, Sacrifice, Resurrection:

According to a recent estimate, one of the worst pandemics in human history was the Spanish influenza of 1918, which killed tens of millions of people. Other diseases are more lethal in a sense. While they may infect fewer people, they kill a higher percentage of the people they do infect.* However, what if we were to compare sin to such a pandemic? Recall the words of Romans 5:12: “Through one man sin entered into the world and death through sin, and thus death spread to all men because they had all sinned.” The infection rate of sin is 100 percent, since all imperfect humans sin. (Read Romans 3:23.) And what is the mortality rate? Paul wrote that sin brings death “to all men.”

Many today do not see sin and death in such dire terms. They worry about what they call premature death, but they dismiss as “natural” the death that creeps up on humans through the aging process. It is all too easy for humans to forget the Creator’s perspective. Our lifespan is infinitely shorter than he meant it to be. Actually, no human has lived for even “one day” from Jehovah’s point of view. (2 Pet. 3:8) God’s Word thus says that our lives are as transitory as a season’s growth of grass or as an exhaled breath. (Ps. 39:5; 1 Pet. 1:24) We need to keep that perspective in mind. Why? If we see the severity of the “disease” that afflicts us, we can better appreciate the value of the “cure”​—our deliverance.

Jehovah asked the faithful man Abraham to do something supremely difficult​—to offer up his son Isaac as a sacrifice. Now, Abraham was a loving father. Jehovah spoke to him of Isaac as “your only son whom you so love.” (Gen. 22:2) Still, Abraham saw that doing Jehovah’s will was even more important than his love for IsaacAbraham went ahead and obeyed. However, Jehovah did not allow Abrahamto do what He himself would do one day. God sent an angel to stop Abraham just before sacrificing his son. Abraham had been so determined to obey his God in this difficult test that he felt sure that his only hope of seeing the young man alive again would be by means of a resurrection. But he had complete faith that God would perform such a resurrection. Indeed, Paul said that Abraham did receive Isaac back by resurrection “in an illustrative way.”​—Heb. 11:19.

14 Can you begin to imagine Abraham’s pain as he prepared to offer up his son? In a sense, Abraham’s experience helps to illustrate that of Jehovah in sacrificing the one he called “my Son, the beloved.” (Matt. 3:17) Remember, though, that Jehovah’s pain was likely more intense. He and his Son had enjoyed associating together for countless millions, perhaps even billions, of years. The Son worked joyously with the Father as his beloved “master worker” and as his Spokesman, “the Word.” (Prov. 8:22,30, 31; John 1:1) What Jehovah endured as his Son was tormented, ridiculed, and then executed as a criminal is far more than we can know. Our deliverance cost Jehovah dearly!

How might we illustrate why we should appreciate the deliverance that Jehovah has made possible for us?

16 Let us return to the illustration given at the outset. Suppose the doctor who finds the cure to the disease were to approach the patients in your ward with this offer: Any patient who accepts treatment and follows the prescribed regimen will without fail be cured. What if most of your fellow patients refused to follow the doctor’s direction, arguing that it would be too much trouble to take the medicine or adhere to the prescribed regimen? Would you go along with them, even though you had convincing evidence that the cure really worked? Of course not! No doubt you would express thanks for the cure and then follow the doctor’s instructions carefully, perhaps even telling others of your choice. In a far greater sense, each of us should be eager to show Jehovah just how much we appreciate the deliverance that he has made possible through the ransom sacrifice of his Son.​—Read Romans 6:17, 18. [excerpts Do You Value What Jehovah Has Done to Deliver You? w ’09]

It’s not that big of a mind stretch to appreciate Abraham’s Act of Faith…the point…Yes, Abraham was a man of Great, Sturdy Faith…faith based on “convincing” evidence…what evidence?! check it out (my purple highlights):

12, 13. What powerful basis for faith in the resurrection did Abraham have?

12 Abraham, who was described as “Jehovah’s friend,” was a man of outstanding faith. (James 2:23) Paul referred to Abraham’s faith three times in his listing of faithful men and women recorded in the 11th chapter of Hebrews. (Hebrews 11:8, 9, 17) His third reference focuses on the faith Abraham displayed when he obediently prepared to offer up his son Isaac as a sacrifice. Abraham was convinced that the promise of a seed through Isaac was guaranteed by Jehovah. Even if Isaac were to die as a sacrifice, Abraham “reckoned that God was able to raise him up even from the dead.

13 As events turned out, when Jehovah saw the strength of Abraham’s faith, he arranged for an animal to substitute as a sacrifice. Still, Isaac’s experience served as an illustration of the resurrection, as Paul explained: “From there he [Abraham] did receive him [Isaac] also in an illustrative way.” (Hebrews 11:19) More than that,Abraham already had a powerful basis for his belief in the resurrection. Had not Jehovah brought back to life Abraham’s reproductive powers when he and his wife, Sarah, came together in their old age and produced their son, Isaac?​Genesis 18:10-14; 21:1-3; Romans 4:19-21. [Excerpts The Resurrection a Bible Teaching That Affects You w ’05]

Faith Immunity…Inconceivable??…NAH!😉

7/7/18 @ 9:45 p.m.

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“elee’o”

compassion courage forgiveness God healing heart humility insights Joan Winifred justice sovereignty Truth wisdom

The Greek “e’leos” “ἔλεος”…verb: “elee’o” (The English: “mercy”)

The Chinese/Mandarin: 怜悯  “lián min” (“mercy”)

The French: la miséricorde divine” (“divine mercy”)

According to lexicographer Gesenius: “The primary idea seems to lie in cherishing, soothing, and in a gentle emotion of mind.” (A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament, translated by E. Robinson, 1836, p. 939) The term is closely related to the word for “womb” or can refer to “bowels,” which are affected when one feels warm and tender sympathy or pity.​—Compare Isa 63:15, 16; Jer 31:20.

In the Scriptures ra·chamʹ is used only once by man toward God, the psalmist saying: “I shall have affection [form of ra·chamʹ] for you, O Jehovah my strength.” (Ps 18:1) Between humans, Joseph displayed this quality when “his inward emotions [form of ra·chamimʹ] were excited” toward his brother Benjamin and he gave way to tears. (Ge 43:29, 30; compare 1Ki 3:25, 26.) When people were subjected to the possibility of being dealt with harshly or unfeelingly by captors (1Ki 8:50; Jer 42:10-12) or by officials of superior authority (Ge 43:14; Ne 1:11; Da 1:9), they desired and prayed to become objects of pity or mercy before such ones, hence, to be treated with favor, gentleness, consideration.​—Contrast Isa 13:17, 18. [my purple highlights of excerpts “Mercy” Insight, vol. 2]

I LOVE that description…”gentle emotion of mind.” …”soothing” “cherishing”… generously gentle of mind = ready to freely forgive 🙂 🙂 🙂

(Gentleness IS stronger than harshness)

forgiveness-fixes

I Forgive You – Do You Forgive Me?

how-to-forgive-the-basics

 

Mercy then, most frequently refers, not to a negative action, a holding back (as of punishment), but to a positive action, to an expression of kind consideration or pity that brings relief to those who are disadvantaged, in need of mercy.

This is well illustrated in Jesus’ parable of the Samaritan who saw the traveler lying by the roadside, robbed and beaten. He showed himself “neighbor” to the man because, moved with pity, he “acted mercifully toward him,” treating his wounds and caring for him. (Lu 10:29-37) No forgiveness of wrongdoing or judicial proceedings were involved.

Hence, the Scriptures show that the mercifulness of Jehovah God is not a quality that comes into play only when persons are, in effect, “on trial” before him because of having committed some particular wrong. Rather, it is a characteristic quality of God’s personality, his normal way of reacting toward those in need, a facet of his love. (2Co 1:3; 1Jo 4:8) He is not like the false gods of the nations​—unfeeling, noncompassionate gods. Instead, “Jehovah is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and great in loving-kindness. Jehovah is good to all, and his mercies are over all his works.” (Ps 145:8, 9; compare Ps 25:8; 104:14, 15, 20-28; Mt 5:45-48; Ac 14:15-17.) He is “rich in mercy,” and the wisdom proceeding from him is “full of mercy.” (Eph 2:4; Jas 3:17) His Son, who revealed what his Father is like (Joh 1:18), showed this by his own personality, speech, and acts. When crowds came out to hear him, and even before seeing their reaction to what he would say, Jesus was “moved with pity [form of splag·khniʹzo·mai]” because they were “skinned and thrown about like sheep without a shepherd.”​—Mr 6:34; Mt 9:36; compare Mt 14:14; 15:32.

Mankind’s need. Obviously, mankind’s basic and greatest disability comes from sin, inherited from their forefather Adam. Thus, all are in dire need, in a pitiable state. Jehovah God has acted mercifully toward mankind as a whole by providing the means for them to become free from this great disability and its consequences of sickness and death. (Mt 20:28; Tit 3:4-7; 1Jo 2:2) As a merciful God, he exercises patience because “he does not desire any to be destroyed but desires all to attain to repentance.” (2Pe 3:9) Jehovah is desirous of doing good toward all, he prefers this (compare Isa 30:18, 19), he finds ‘no delight in the death of the wicked,’ and “not out of his own heart has he afflicted or does he grieve the sons of men,” as in the destruction of Judah and Jerusalem. (Eze 33:11; La 3:31-33) It is the hardheartedness of persons, their obstinacy and refusal to respond to his graciousness and mercifulness, that obliges him to take a different course toward them, causes his mercies to be “shut off” from flowing toward them.​—Ps 77:9; Jer 13:10, 14; Isa 13:9; Ro 2:4-11. [my purple highlights of excerpts “Mercy” Insight, vol. 2]

Divine mercy enables all of us-disabled-fellow-fragile-life!🙂

Working with mercy…

Warning about a characteristic that works against mercy and “the kingly law” of love, James wrote: “If you continue showing favoritism, you are working a sin, for you are reproved by the law as transgressors.” (James 2:8, 9) Showing undue favor to the materially rich or to those having prominence can make us less sensitive to “the complaining cry of the lowly one.” (Proverbs 21:13) Favoritism stifles a merciful spirit. We practice mercy by treating others impartially.

Merciful tongues…

Concerning the tongue, James said: “An unruly injurious thing, it is full of death-dealing poison. With it we bless Jehovah, even the Father, and yet with it we curse men who have come into existence ‘in the likeness of God.’ Out of the same mouth come forth blessing and cursing.” In this context, James added: “If you have bitter jealousy and contentiousness in your hearts, do not be bragging and lying against the truth. This is not the wisdom that comes down from above, but is the earthly, animal, demonic. For where jealousy and contentiousness are, there disorder and every vile thing are. But the wisdom from above is first of all chaste, then peaceable, reasonable, ready to obey, full of mercy and good fruits, not making partial distinctions, not hypocritical.”​—James 3:8-10a, 14-17.

11. How can we be merciful in the use of our tongue?

11 Hence, the way we use our tongue is an indication of whether we have the wisdom that is “full of mercy.” What if because of jealousy or contentiousness we were to boast, lie, or spread harmful gossip? Psalm 94:4 states: “All the practicers of what is hurtful keep bragging about themselves.” And how quickly injurious talk can damage an innocent one’s good reputation! (Psalm 64:2-4) Moreover, think of the harm that can be done by “a false witness [who] launches forth mere lies.” (Proverbs 14:5; 1 Kings 21:7-13) After discussing the misuse of the tongue, James says: “It is not proper, my brothers, for these things to go on occurring this way.” (James 3:10b) True mercy requires that we use our tongue in a chaste, peaceable, and reasonable way. Jesus said: “I tell you that every unprofitable saying that men speak, they will render an account concerning it on Judgment Day.” (Matthew 12:36) How important it is that we be merciful in the use of our tongue!

Freely giving what is inside… us…:) (what am i full of? lol;)…bologna(baloney)?? hot air?? -lol:))

Why should we work to increase the influence that mercy has on our lives?

18 “Give as gifts of mercy the things that are inside,” said Jesus. (Luke 11:41) For a good deed to be an act of true mercy, it must be a gift that comes from inside​—from a loving and willing heart. (2 Corinthians 9:7) In a world where harshness, selfishness, and a lack of concern about the suffering and problems of others are the norm, how refreshing such mercy is! [above excerpts Practice Mercy–How? W 07]

A living “proof” — depth of a full love… is a full forgiveness…:)… (and may be a shoulder to cry on;))

(Real PROOF is LIVING!)

7/6/18 @ 6:01 p.m.

p.s.

The Greek eʹle·os conveys some of the sense of the Hebrew ra·chamimʹ. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words says: “ELEOS (ἔλεος) ‘is the outward manifestation of pity; it assumes need on the part of him who receives it, and resources adequate to meet the need on the part of him who shows it.’” The verb (e·le·eʹo) generally conveys the idea of feeling “sympathy with the misery of another, and especially sympathy manifested in act.” (1981, Vol. 3, pp. 60, 61) Hence, the blind, the demon-possessed, the leprous, or those whose children were afflicted were among those who evoked eʹle·os, the expression of mercy, pity. (Mt 9:27; 15:22;17:15; Mr 5:18, 19; Lu 17:12, 13) In response to the plea, “Have mercy on us,” Jesus performed miracles relieving such ones. He did so, not in a routine, apathetic way, but “moved with pity” (Mt 20:31, 34), the Gospel writer here using a form of the verb splag·khniʹzo·mai, which is related to splagʹkhna,literally meaning “intestines.” (Ac 1:18) This verb expresses the feeling of pity, whereas eʹle·os refers to the active manifestation of such pity, hence an act of mercy. [my purple highlights of excerpts “Mercy” Insight, vol. 2]

being moved/moving = active manifestation…(of mercy)

question for reflection:

what’s moving me??

p.p.s.
i’ve just updated the missing music…from post linked “proof” btw.

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